Bayco Jewels Unveils 206-Carat Colombian Emerald

The Imperial Emerald, a 206-carat Colombian emerald unveiled by Bayco Jewels at Baselworld 2013 • Image courtesy of Bayco Jewels

The Imperial Emerald, a 206-carat Colombian emerald unveiled by Bayco Jewels at Baselworld 2013 • Image courtesy of Bayco Jewels

New York-based Bayco Jewels stunned visitors on the opening day of the 2013 Baselworld watch and jewelry show with one of the world’s rarest gemstones, a 206-carat Colombian emerald. Dubbed the Imperial Emerald, the one-of-a-kind gem is not only astonishing for its size and ideal color but for its exceptional clarity and lack of treatment.

“This unveiling represents a milestone for the history of Bayco and the industry. This gem is a representation of the exquisite high standards of our brand. To follow the essence of our history, is to continue to create or discover one of a kind treasures that are not attainable by many but befall a treasure to some,” said Moris and Giacomo Hadjibay, co-owners of Bayco Jewels LLC.

Rare and resplendent, emerald’s rich velvety green has been coveted since antiquity. And while color is paramount when it comes to judging fine emeralds, clarity is usually secondary, as emeralds often display visible inclusions that are sometimes called “jardin” in the industry. Most emeralds today are treated to improve their clarity, and it is uncommon to find clean emeralds, especially in larger sizes. The Imperial Emerald’s lack of treatment, rich color, and incredible size distinguish it as one of the most important emeralds to date.

Bayco’s Imperial Emerald is simply mind-boggling for its natural beauty. The stone has been graded by world-renowned gem authorities, including the Gübelin Gem Laboratory in Switzerland. The emerald received a Gem Portrait from Gübelin, which is reserved for exceptionally rare stones. Only a handful of Gem Portraits have ever been created by Gübelin, and stones must meet rigorous criteria set by senior gemologists at the lab.

“This is the first of its type that we give such a book,” notes Daniel Nyfeler, Managing Director of the Gübelin Gem Laboratory. “That in itself should make a statement about the exceptionality of this gem.”

Founded in 1982, Bayco Jewels continues to create rare and exceptional one-of-a-kind  pieces with some of the finest gemstones in the world, including rubies, emeralds, sapphires, and rare diamonds.

One-of-a-kind creations featuring rare gemstones from Bayco Jewels • Image courtesy of Bayco Jewels

One-of-a-kind creations featuring rare gemstones from Bayco Jewels • Image courtesy of Bayco Jewels

Rare Pink Princie Diamond Fetches $39 Million at Christie’s

The Princie Diamond, a rare 34.65-carat fancy-intense pink, fetched over $39 million at Christie's New York

The Princie Diamond, a rare 34.65-carat fancy-intense pink, fetched over $39 million at Christie’s New York

 

The incredible 34.65-carat pink Princie Diamond fetched over $39 million at Christie’s New York on April 16. The rare fancy-intense pink diamond’s sale price set a new record for any jewel sold at Christie’s, surpassing the previous house record of $24.3 million for the sale of the Wittelsbach diamond in December 2008. Christie’s stated that the Princie also set a new record for the most valuable Golconda diamond ever sold at auction.

The Princie Diamond is not only remarkable for its size and color, but for its origin and royal provenance. A historic diamond, the Princie’s origins can be traced to the famed Indian Golconda mines, an ancient source which produced some of the world’s most renowned diamonds, including the Hope. The rare pink was owned by Hyderabad’s royal family during the Mughal Empire and emerged at auction for the first time in 1960 as the “Property of a Gentleman,” later revealed to be the Nizam of Hyderabad. Van Cleef & Arpels’ London branch bought the diamond for £46,000. The pink diamond was named “Princie” in honor of the 14-year-old Prince of Baroda, who attended a party at Van Cleef & Arpels’ Paris store with his mother Maharani Sita Devi. Until yesterday, the diamond had not appeared at auction for over fifty years.

“A major event took place in the global auction industry with the record breaking sale of The Princie Diamond at Christie’s New York,” said Rahul Kadakia, Head of Jewelry for Christie’s Americas and Switzerland. “Aside from Christie’s sale of the legendary Collection of Elizabeth Taylor, this was the most successful jewelry auction ever held in the United States, and Christie’s was proud to have orchestrated the sale of such an historic gemstone.”

The Princie Diamond was sold to an anonymous collector bidding by phone.

Christie’s April auction of over 290 jewels garnered a total of $81,358,700. Top lots included a 30.32-carat D-color diamond, which fetched the second highest price of over $4.4 million. A 23.30-carat marquise-cut diamond ring by Harry Winston sold for over $3.2 million, and a rare 3-strand natural pearl necklace fetched over $1.1 million at the day-long auction.

Visit Christie’s New York Magnificent Jewels and The Princie Diamond to view results.

Highlights from Christie’s New York Magnificent Jewels 

  • Diamond necklace by William Goldberg • Christie's

Step into Paula Crevoshay’s Garden of Light

Isis - Orchid brooch/wrist cuff with tsavorite garnet, yellow sapphire, pink sapphire, and diamond by Paula Crevoshay • Photo by Chris Chavez

Isis – Orchid brooch/wrist cuff with tsavorite garnet, yellow sapphire, pink sapphire, and diamond by Paula Crevoshay • Photo by Chris Chavez

 

An enchanting dream…to step into a garden of jewels, to be surrounded by the vivid colors of the world’s rarest gemstones in one-of-a-kind designs by Paula Crevoshay. A fantasy? The Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh is offering visitors a walk through a bejeweled world with its new exhibition, Garden of Light: Works by Paula Crevoshay.

The exhibition features over 60 original pieces by Ms. Crevoshay, an award-winning jewelry artist who continues to enthrall with stunning creations inspired by nature. And Crevoshay’s Garden not only depicts the objects themselves–flowers, insects, and plants–but illustrates the relationships between living organisms and the environments where they thrive. By using natural materials, including gold and rare gemstones, Crevoshay creates whole ecosystems with stunning diversity. Color is captured in gem form, and just as natural color can appear wildly surreal, Crevoshay’s art conveys a sense of awe about the natural world.

“It’s in our nature to mimic nature,” said Crevoshay. “As an artist, I mirror back to nature that which it inspires in me, which in turn strikes a chord in my viewers.”

Many of the jewelry pieces are displayed with striking minerals and insects from Carnegie’s natural history collection, juxtaposing art and life. From a spectacular orchid pendant to a delicate spider, Crevoshay inspires us to take a fresh look at our natural environment.

Garden of Light: Works by Paula Crevoshay runs from April 13 to August 11, 2013. Visit the Carnegie Museum of Natural History to learn more.

And also visit Contemporary Jewelry Design Group for a wonderful interview with Paula Crevoshay from CJDG editor Monica Stephenson: Conversations: Paula Crevoshay – Garden of Light.

Images courtesy of Paula Crevoshay

  • Midnight Seduction Ladyslipper orchid pendant with sapphire, blue zircon, black diamond, coral, and abalone pearl by Paula Crevoshay • Photo by Chris Chavez